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Information & Advice

...for Students

...for Staff

...on Assistive Technology

Exams & Revision

 

 

Introduction: What is revision?

It is worth regularly revisiting work you have covered. This way you become familiar with the content. Try and get into the habit of looking over lecture notes at regular times (for example at the end of each day).

Revision is not a last minute panic to cram in as much as possible.

 

Before you start to revise

Positive thinking

TAKE CONTROL!

Helpful tips for stress free learning

Remember little and often is better than long periods of study

 

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Organisation

Exams and revision can be tackled with careful preparation and a methodical, organised approach.

You may wish to devise a plan before you start. (See printable revision planner). Additionally, you may also wish to use a list of topics to be covered to tick off once you are confident you have covered all of the information and committed it to memory.

 

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Revision and learning style

Exams do place emphasis on memory and remembering information (often in sequence). In order to enhance your memory, you can use multisensory approaches (that is methods that use a variety of different senses – sight, movement, sound and so on). Some of the methods for revision suggested below involve appealing to the different senses, not just reading and writing. It may be worth considering a variety of approaches and see which work best for you. Here are some suggestions for different learning styles which relate to the VARK learning styles (Visual, Aural, Reading, Kinaesthetic).

 

Visual – seeing pictures, diagrams, using images and visuals

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Aural – listening to things, talking, discussing

 

 

Reading – written and printed information

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Kinaesthetic – hands on, acting out, touching and doing

 

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Some suggested approaches to revision

Visual approach.

 

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Smell and taste approach.

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Sound approach.

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Movement approach (‘walk through’)

This works particularly well for information that needs to be learned in sequence.

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Use past papers.

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Other devices that you could use include:

 

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Before the exam

Find out the basic information about the exams, for example:

Find out about the exam instructions, for example:

 

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In the exam.

 

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Stress

What causes stress?

How can you cope with stress?

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How you can reduce stress?

You body and brain will function more efficiently if it has:

Healthy food

Eat regular meals and use this time to calm down and to relax. Some food can increase your anxiety levels especially sugar in foods, tea or coffee. Make a note of foods you feel make you feel this way and avoid having them.

Sleep

The most valuable hours of sleep are those between 8pm and 12pm. Just try until your exams are finished to have earlier nights. You could video record a programme you would like to see.

Water

We should all be drinking approximately 2 litres of water a day. Try to at least increase your water intake as it has a positive effect on brain function.

Relaxation

Listening to music, playing a musical instrument, yoga, even day-dreaming – find a way to relax. Build relaxation into your regular breaks.

Breathing

Learning how to control your breathing helps to reduce stress and can be very effective in controlling panic during exams – take deep breaths through your mouth and breathe out slowly through your nose, focusing on the breath as you exhale.

Regular exercise

Try to find a way of taking regular exercise doing some every day. If you raise your heartbeat for just 15 minutes a day your body and brain will function more efficiently.

Printable Revision Planner

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